A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Syncretic Egyptian / Graeco-Roman magic from the collection of texts known as the Papyri Graecae Magicae.
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monsnoleedra
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#11 » Thu Feb 28, 2019 10:58 am

Here's another resource to add to the list.

N. E. Akyürek Şahin, The Cult of Hecate in Lydia: Evidence from the Manisa Museum, Gephyra 13, 2016, 1-48.

In this article, the cult of Hecate in Lydia is examined on the basis of both the Hecate monuments housed in the Manisa Museum and those whose Lydian origin is asserted by publications. The mo¬numents have been compiled in a catalogue and described archaeologically; they are com-mented on from the point of view of their significance for the cult of Hecate in Lydia. The cata-logue is divided into 5 parts: 1. The monuments whose provenance is established, 2. The monu-ments whose provenance remains unknown, 3. The monuments outside the museum, 4. Coins, 5. Two other monuments that may be related to Hecate. Till now only two inscriptions concerning the cult have been attested in Lydia (see cat. no. 6 and 8). Apart from the inscriptions, there are Hecateia and stelai and reliefs which depict the goddess. At the end we can state that the worship of Hecate is not particularly prevalent in Lydia. However, nearly 20 examples provide evidence for the existence of the goddess’ veneration in this region. Their find spots are Philadelphia, Maionia, Satala, Thyateira, Sardis, Kollyda and Sidas. By relying on their provenance, one can suggest that there were cultic places or local temples in the cities of Philadelphia and Maionia, and even in the countryside of Thyateira. We can learn from these monuments that the goddess was not wor-shipped in the whole of Lydia, but especially in the eastern parts of the region (north-western Lydian, i.e. the south of Mysia Abbaïtis). It is argued that this situation can be explained by the influences of Phrygian cult and culture on Lydia. In the west of Lydia, where this influence was not so strong and where Hellenization was very extensive, evidence for the cult of Hecate was quite scarce. Nearly all the monuments in this article date from the 2nd century A.D.
Keywords: Hecate; Lydia; Manisa Museum; Hecateion; Mysia Abbaïtis.


https://www.academia.edu/25729575/N._E. ... _2016_1-48
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#12 » Wed Mar 06, 2019 11:09 am

Here's another's Thesis research project that can be added to your material on Hekate library.

Reflections on the Enigmatic Goddess: The Origins of Hekate and the Development of her Character to the End of the Fifth Century B.C.

This is a study aimed at reconsidering the origins, in the broadest sense of the word, of the ancient goddess Hekate. To the best of our knowledge, what is the geographical provenance of Hekate? What does the evidence for the goddess up to the end of the fifth century B.C. tell us about the development of her character in the Greek religious world? Why did Hekate acquire such frightening and evil connections to the supernatural and black magic by this point? Although several theories have been proposed about the origin of Hekate, a Karian provenance remains the most likely, notwithstanding the Hellenistic date of the evidence that is normally cited. Tenuous links and methodological flaws characterise the theories that she was Mycenaean or Mesopotamian, while the Thracian theory rests on a fallacious assumption that Hekate evolved from the Thracian Bendis. The Karian theory is propped up by a variety of data that allows us to draw back incrementally the date to which Hekate’s worship in the region may be assigned. Evidence until the end of the fifth century is chronologically dichotomous: the earliest evidence, Hesiod’s Theogony, depicts a great, benevolent goddess, while evidence from the second half of the fifth century characterizes Hekate as a malevolent deity connected to ghosts, witchcraft, and sorcery who could and would occasion grievous harm to people, especially parturient women or newborns. This aspect of Hekate’s divinity in relation to women’s transitions and the failure thereof seems to have become particularly pronounced following her introduction to the Panhellenic pantheon and her mythic subordination to Artemis. But did the goddess ever bear inherent connections to the dead, despite Hesiod’s glowing Hymn to her? Milesian archaeological evidence suggests she might have. However, it was the acquisition of magical properties that ultimately extinguished much of Hekate’s benevolence. It seems most likely that the Thessalian reputation for black magic, which was a direct result of medism in 485 and 480 B.C., was causative of this, given Hekate’s close association with the Thessalian Enodia.


There is a link for a downloadable PDF file
https://ourarchive.otago.ac.nz/handle/10523/4763
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#13 » Fri Jul 12, 2019 2:39 pm

I've place this here vice under new books since it deals with Hekate and is about a specific form of Hekatean Witchcraft as described by this particular author. The book is somewhat of a "course" in how it is set-up and the reader advances through the chapters. Much of the material from what I can gather (no I have no purchased the book yet) is a repeat of established material. The remainder of course will be centered about the particulars of the authors specifics and concepts.

Keeping Her Keys: An Introduction To Hekate's Modern Witchcraft Paperback – April 26, 2019
by Cyndi Brannen

Over the past few years Hekate has gained increasing popularity around the world. While there are books written about the historical Hekate, there is a lack of information applying this knowledge for personal development and practicing witchcraft. Keeping Her Keys blends the ‘keys' of personal development, magick and the ancient goddess, Hekate, together. Topics include the power of prayer, how to create sacred space, and guidance on spell crafting. In the final chapter readers can perform an optional self-initiation to become a Keeper of Her Keys.


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1789040752?pf_rd_p=1581d9f4-062f-453c-b69e-0f3e00ba2652&pf_rd_r=NWE6M7709QVYWNFJKJGX
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monsnoleedra
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#14 » Wed Jul 24, 2019 1:16 pm

Just another addition to reference material.

Section 3

16. SOME CULTS OF GREEK GODDESSES AND FEMALE DAEMONS OF ORIENTAL ORIGIN especially in relation to the mythology of goddesses and daemons in the Semitic world. David Reid West, University of Glasglow (1986-1990), Chapter Four - The Goddess Hekate and Related Chthonian Daemons. with Antecedents in Semitic Demonology. (pgs 255-409) (Chapter 2 section A pertains to Artemis) (have entire dissertation)

17. The Transformation of Hekate: Evolution of the Goddess from 800 BCE to 400 BCE, Imogen Sealy, University of Texas at Austin, May 2016, (Have)

Section 5: Christian References
01 The City of God Against the Pagans, Book XIX, Chapter 23, Porphyry’s account of the answer’s given by oracles of the gods concerning Christ, pages 953-960, Cambridge University Press, 1998, ISBN 0 521 46475 7 Edited and translated by R. W. Dyson (Have)
Last edited by monsnoleedra on Mon Jul 29, 2019 6:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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monsnoleedra
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#15 » Mon Jul 29, 2019 6:12 pm

Section 3: Academic Research Articles, Dissertation’s & Master’s Projects

18. HEKATE: A SYMBOL OF THE DANGERS OF FEMININE KNOWLEDGE IN EURIPIDES by KATHRYN M. SMITH, 12 June 2016, graduate program in Classics and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts (HAVE)

https://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/bitstream ... sequence=1

Without looking at the Argonautica and later Roman portrayals of Hekate, such as
Ovid and Seneca, I want to explore Hekate’s relationship with Greek tragedy. How does a
goddess evolve so quickly from possessing a share of land, sea, and earth (Theogony) and
becoming the attendant to Persephone (Homeric Hymn to Demeter) to the goddess of
witchcraft (Argonautica) less than five hundred years later. I believe Medea’s reliance on
Hekate for assistance navigating the liminal space between the feminine sphere of nature
and the masculine sphere of culture in Euripides’ tragedy began Hekate’s transformation.
After mentioning Hekate and Medea’s close relationship in Medea (431 BCE), Euripides
consequent mentions of Hekate [Hippolytus (428 BCE), Troades (415 BCE), Helen (412
BCE), Phoenician Women (410 BCE)] bring certain connotations into each scene. I am
exploring what those connotations might be and how Medea started it.
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isis
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#16 » Sun Aug 25, 2019 2:36 am

Cheers for sharing such a wonderful list!
Timing is quite interesting as she recently made appearance in my dreams again :lol:

I’ve been spending time just writing down the things she’s sharing. Two of which, her connection to Anubis and her connection to the valkyries. Not sure if you’ve encountered that.
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Re: A list of reference material for Hekate research.

Post#17 » Mon Aug 26, 2019 3:49 am

isis wrote:Cheers for sharing such a wonderful list!
... <snip>


Yes indeed, this thread is a great example of the kinds of topics that are the heart of this place. Reference material that will be valuable long after it's posted. Thank you for the diligent sharing Monsoleedra.
Cheers,

Prov

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