Odd Insights into Hekate

Syncretic Egyptian / Graeco-Roman magic from the collection of texts known as the Papyri Graecae Magicae.
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monsnoleedra
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Re: Odd Insights into Hekate

Post#51 » Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:29 pm

sorry for multiple replies getting used to this forum's format

The witches Hecate really gets formed with Roman influence more so than Hellene influence. Modern Pagan's I think like to use Hellene, especially the story of Medea but to the Hellene's she was an outsider and use that to justify things and why Hekate was bad in that sense. But one also has to remember in that story Hekate is also more a High Priest to Artemis than an Actual goddess in her own right.

The Queen of Witches and dark magic and all really gets that label under Latin (Roman) lore more so than Hellene lore. Just as Hekate will change from a young woman to the older woman in imagery as well. A lot of that I believe in part due to the conflating with the Latin goddess Tri-Formus. Though to some degree it will also occur due to the conflating of Artemis-Hekate-Selene with Diana-Tri-Formus-Luna and the Sanctuary/temple at Nemi with Diana Nemorensis and the story of Orestes and Iphigenia. Which will also include the Rex Nemorensis, the blood slaying, the Temple of Artemis at Orthia, the Temple of Artemis at Brauron.

The Medea story though does tie into the Hekate influence somewhat into the Eleusinian Mysteries in that she is in the Samothrace area as it all ties into the Black Sea and Thracian influence. Unfortunately while the mysteries revolve around Demeter, Persephone and Hekate she does not participate as a member at all the sites where the mysteries are actually known to be performed. Nor is Hekate actually part of the original story, nor found in all versions of the story. In most instances she is in fact just a companion to Persephone in the story not the one who actually leads her from the underworld. That task actually falls to Hermes, Hekate follows behind Persephone and holds her torch(s) behind and above her to light the way.

In some of the pottery pieces and plays it is suggested that Hekate might actually be performing the role of guiding the child Persephone from the last remnants of her childhood into the passage into the first stages of her womanhood. To be performing her role as the birthing goddess who brings the child into the world, only in this instances she has brought the child from the passage of her trials and passes her as a woman into the world above t mark the end of her childhood. Making it a true Maiden (Hekate), Mother (Persephone) and Crone (Demeter) in the sense that Hekate is the virgin, Persephone is the mother figure who brings fertility and fecundity back to the land with her return and Demeter is the crone who gives up the sterility of winter's barren hold with her return to the surface.

The Lampadephoros persona ties into her Macedonian / Byzantine identity. Though historically it gets a bit confusing in that sometimes it's equated to Hekate, other times to Artemis. Though the crescent moon and star image have been used by many different nations and groups it still does not rule out a specific association to an historical / mythological event.

According to accounts which vary in some of the details, in 340 BCE the Byzantines and their allies the Athenians were under siege by the troops of Philip of Macedon. On a particularly dark and wet night Philip attempted a surprise attack but was thwarted by the appearance of a bright light in the sky. This light is occasionally described by subsequent interpreters as a meteor, sometimes as the moon, and some accounts also mention the barking of dogs. However, the original accounts mention only a light in the sky, without specifying the moon. To commemorate the event the Byzantines erected a statue of Hecate lampadephoros (light-bearer or bringer). This story survived in the works of Hesychius of Miletus, who in all probability lived in the time of Justinian I. His works survive only in fragments preserved in Photius and the tenth century lexicographer Suidas. The tale is also related by Stephanus of Byzantium, and Eustathius.


The Chaldean Hekate shows up about the same time as the Latin crone version of the witches Hekate. What is interesting is the Chaldean has the Dogs head, the Cows Head, The Horse head as a norm. Occasionally there is a 4th head that can be that of a dragon or that of a Lion. The Lion is said to be associated with Kybele / Cybele at times. The dragon / serpent though that one at times is said to be associated with the Hydra at times.

Harder to trace but sometimes equated to the stories that the Hydra guarded the swampy entrance to the underworld just as Cerberus guarded the island entrance. Hekate like Hermes also could come and go from Hades at will and drive the restless dead before her. Yet some stories claim she brought them in via a different route as they didn't need a coin for Charon the Boatman. She could also bring out the dead to place them as guardian's or dispatch them to punish if she desired. Again not needing to appease Charon or provide to the boatman.

It also tied into stories of her holding dominion over the waters. She held dominion over the land, sky and water. Yet as as secondary titan she didn't hold dominion over the deep water but coastal and inland waters. That gave her dominion over the creatures as well, that placed her in control over the hydra being a creature of the water and land. In that role she was also prayed to by fishermen and sailors and had shrines and sanctuaries in coastal areas. Ironically this is an area that is not spoken to much about in most pagan practices. Most tend to focus primarily upon her magical influence.

One thing I do find interesting is that the 29th of each month on the Latin calendar was listed as sacred to Hecate yet there are no sanctuaries / temples to Hecate in Italy. The Sanctuary at Nemi aka Diana Mirror is associated to Hekate because of the three figures associated on coinage with the sanctuary / temple. Yet none are specifically stated as being Hecate / Triformus. It is presumed / assumed due to the three figures engraved upon the coins mostly. There are some references to Hekate in Sicily with the temples to Demeter & Persephone but those predate the Roman's and belong to the earlier Hellene settlements. To my knowledge no sanctuaries / temples have been discovered for triformus either so the idea of the 29th being a sacred date or of importance raises questions.

From a Hellene aspect the primary calendar we have to go by is the Athenian calendar which was not utilized by all of Hellas (Greece). So the legitimacy of it's dates raises questions beyond the extent of how widely was it's influence and correctness for the other poleis (Greek city states). For instance we know Laconia (Sparta) had a different calendar than Athens did.

Different calendars and holidays would give rise to different holidays, rituals, ceremonies, practices, etc in how they worshiped. Historically it's know that even the 12 Olympian's were not the exact same 12 all over Hellas though the changes were relatively minor by only 1 or 2 changes. But it was often enough to change how a god / goddess was seen.

Consider Hekate in Athens was an outsider and foreign if we look at how Medea was seen and though of in the Argonautica story. She was not seen as an Olympian but as either an Titian or an outsider if you consider her placement in the Troy story. She is placed with Artemis in the stories backstory. Yet Artemis is aligned with the Trojan's and actually sides with them against the Olympian's in the sense she impede's the Hellene fleet. She is born on the Anatolian side of the sea and it is not until the war is over that we actually see the Olympian pantheon settle out and stabilize. But prior to the war and during the war you see the gods & goddesses align pretty much by where they "originate" from. Hekate's history ties her closely to Artemis and Leto and they are placed on the side of the Trojan's which suggest's Hekate originates there as well. Either Thrace or Anatolia / Caria.
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Re: Odd Insights into Hekate

Post#52 » Wed Nov 08, 2017 5:55 am

I was thinking this expert may arrive from another place so this is good here for discussion. 8-)
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Pablo
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Re: Odd Insights into Hekate

Post#53 » Wed Nov 08, 2017 6:27 am

monsnoleedra wrote:sorry for multiple replies getting used to this forum's format

The witches Hecate really gets formed with Roman influence more so than Hellene influence. Modern Pagan's I think like to use Hellene, especially the story of Medea but to the Hellene's she was an outsider and use that to justify things and why Hekate was bad in that sense. But one also has to remember in that story Hekate is also more a High Priest to Artemis than an Actual goddess in her own right.

The Queen of Witches and dark magic and all really gets that label under Latin (Roman) lore more so than Hellene lore. Just as Hekate will change from a young woman to the older woman in imagery as well. A lot of that I believe in part due to the conflating with the Latin goddess Tri-Formus. Though to some degree it will also occur due to the conflating of Artemis-Hekate-Selene with Diana-Tri-Formus-Luna and the Sanctuary/temple at Nemi with Diana Nemorensis and the story of Orestes and Iphigenia. Which will also include the Rex Nemorensis, the blood slaying, the Temple of Artemis at Orthia, the Temple of Artemis at Brauron.

The Medea story though does tie into the Hekate influence somewhat into the Eleusinian Mysteries in that she is in the Samothrace area as it all ties into the Black Sea and Thracian influence. Unfortunately while the mysteries revolve around Demeter, Persephone and Hekate she does not participate as a member at all the sites where the mysteries are actually known to be performed. Nor is Hekate actually part of the original story, nor found in all versions of the story. In most instances she is in fact just a companion to Persephone in the story not the one who actually leads her from the underworld. That task actually falls to Hermes, Hekate follows behind Persephone and holds her torch(s) behind and above her to light the way.

In some of the pottery pieces and plays it is suggested that Hekate might actually be performing the role of guiding the child Persephone from the last remnants of her childhood into the passage into the first stages of her womanhood. To be performing her role as the birthing goddess who brings the child into the world, only in this instances she has brought the child from the passage of her trials and passes her as a woman into the world above t mark the end of her childhood. Making it a true Maiden (Hekate), Mother (Persephone) and Crone (Demeter) in the sense that Hekate is the virgin, Persephone is the mother figure who brings fertility and fecundity back to the land with her return and Demeter is the crone who gives up the sterility of winter's barren hold with her return to the surface.

The Lampadephoros persona ties into her Macedonian / Byzantine identity. Though historically it gets a bit confusing in that sometimes it's equated to Hekate, other times to Artemis. Though the crescent moon and star image have been used by many different nations and groups it still does not rule out a specific association to an historical / mythological event.

According to accounts which vary in some of the details, in 340 BCE the Byzantines and their allies the Athenians were under siege by the troops of Philip of Macedon. On a particularly dark and wet night Philip attempted a surprise attack but was thwarted by the appearance of a bright light in the sky. This light is occasionally described by subsequent interpreters as a meteor, sometimes as the moon, and some accounts also mention the barking of dogs. However, the original accounts mention only a light in the sky, without specifying the moon. To commemorate the event the Byzantines erected a statue of Hecate lampadephoros (light-bearer or bringer). This story survived in the works of Hesychius of Miletus, who in all probability lived in the time of Justinian I. His works survive only in fragments preserved in Photius and the tenth century lexicographer Suidas. The tale is also related by Stephanus of Byzantium, and Eustathius.


The Chaldean Hekate shows up about the same time as the Latin crone version of the witches Hekate. What is interesting is the Chaldean has the Dogs head, the Cows Head, The Horse head as a norm. Occasionally there is a 4th head that can be that of a dragon or that of a Lion. The Lion is said to be associated with Kybele / Cybele at times. The dragon / serpent though that one at times is said to be associated with the Hydra at times.

Harder to trace but sometimes equated to the stories that the Hydra guarded the swampy entrance to the underworld just as Cerberus guarded the island entrance. Hekate like Hermes also could come and go from Hades at will and drive the restless dead before her. Yet some stories claim she brought them in via a different route as they didn't need a coin for Charon the Boatman. She could also bring out the dead to place them as guardian's or dispatch them to punish if she desired. Again not needing to appease Charon or provide to the boatman.

It also tied into stories of her holding dominion over the waters. She held dominion over the land, sky and water. Yet as as secondary titan she didn't hold dominion over the deep water but coastal and inland waters. That gave her dominion over the creatures as well, that placed her in control over the hydra being a creature of the water and land. In that role she was also prayed to by fishermen and sailors and had shrines and sanctuaries in coastal areas. Ironically this is an area that is not spoken to much about in most pagan practices. Most tend to focus primarily upon her magical influence.

One thing I do find interesting is that the 29th of each month on the Latin calendar was listed as sacred to Hecate yet there are no sanctuaries / temples to Hecate in Italy. The Sanctuary at Nemi aka Diana Mirror is associated to Hekate because of the three figures associated on coinage with the sanctuary / temple. Yet none are specifically stated as being Hecate / Triformus. It is presumed / assumed due to the three figures engraved upon the coins mostly. There are some references to Hekate in Sicily with the temples to Demeter & Persephone but those predate the Roman's and belong to the earlier Hellene settlements. To my knowledge no sanctuaries / temples have been discovered for triformus either so the idea of the 29th being a sacred date or of importance raises questions.

From a Hellene aspect the primary calendar we have to go by is the Athenian calendar which was not utilized by all of Hellas (Greece). So the legitimacy of it's dates raises questions beyond the extent of how widely was it's influence and correctness for the other poleis (Greek city states). For instance we know Laconia (Sparta) had a different calendar than Athens did.

Different calendars and holidays would give rise to different holidays, rituals, ceremonies, practices, etc in how they worshiped. Historically it's know that even the 12 Olympian's were not the exact same 12 all over Hellas though the changes were relatively minor by only 1 or 2 changes. But it was often enough to change how a god / goddess was seen.

Consider Hekate in Athens was an outsider and foreign if we look at how Medea was seen and though of in the Argonautica story. She was not seen as an Olympian but as either an Titian or an outsider if you consider her placement in the Troy story. She is placed with Artemis in the stories backstory. Yet Artemis is aligned with the Trojan's and actually sides with them against the Olympian's in the sense she impede's the Hellene fleet. She is born on the Anatolian side of the sea and it is not until the war is over that we actually see the Olympian pantheon settle out and stabilize. But prior to the war and during the war you see the gods & goddesses align pretty much by where they "originate" from. Hekate's history ties her closely to Artemis and Leto and they are placed on the side of the Trojan's which suggest's Hekate originates there as well. Either Thrace or Anatolia / Caria.



Wow! :goodpost

"But one also has to remember in that story Hekate is also more a High Priest to Artemis than an Actual goddess in her own right.". Does this imply that Hekate was a physical person? I am thinking a (subsequently) deified ancestor here.
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talerman
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Re: Odd Insights into Hekate

Post#54 » Wed Nov 08, 2017 7:46 am

monsnoleedra :goodpost

What I am going to write below are not my thoughts at all, but I tried to summarise some more modern interpretations of Hecate. So I wonder what you think what can be right and what can be wrong from the below few sentences . Yes, off course, I would also like to hear Pablo's and other respected members opinions:

In modern interpretation Selena passes the Moon to Hecate when it is waning. She is seen as a third aspect of the Moon Goddess together with Diana and Selena. Yet, she also has three different aspects as: the goddess of fertility and abundance; the goddess of the Moon, magic and night; and the goddess of spirits and shadows. Some witches use Hecate's wheel as Hecate's symbol. This wheel represents Hecate in her three aspects. It has a form of a labyrinth as Hecate is also a protector of the crossroads. In that function, she looks at three directions. The modern witches say that Hecate is a high priestess who found her inner knowledge and is ready to teach others. They also say that Hecate represents the dark within us and a part of our psych which we don't accept. Her powers are appalling and she definitely doesn't belong to tender goddesses - her rage is swift and violent against the ones who dare to bring evil to her devotees. Modern worshipers evoke Hecate usually at the Waning Moon in order to banish evil spirits, remove bad habits or talk to the dead. She is also evoked by some magicians to bring justice.  She is usually associated to: star sapphire, moon stone, pearls, larch, cypress, poppy, oak, camphor, bows, aloes dogs, horses and black cats. Her favorite colors are silver and black.
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Re: Odd Insights into Hekate

Post#55 » Wed Nov 08, 2017 8:52 am

Leonardo_Drakon wrote:
phillip wrote:Ha - I too was working with Hekate last night due to the Dark Moon. The twin torches representing the two morning/evening planets - the concept is fascinating! Thank you for the links, as well - I will enjoy settling down with a cup of coffee and going through the material as soon as I take off my shoes. I am unsure if it against the T&C here to post the Facebook link you mentioned, but would you point me in that direction if possible?


I'm not quite sure what the rules are here regarding Facebook, so I sent you a PM with the info.


Just saw this point about posting FB links ... completely fine. I think most folks here have FB. SA has a FB group as well. Now I'm curious as to what the link was ... So post it Leonardo. ;)
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monsnoleedra
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Re: Odd Insights into Hekate

Post#56 » Wed Nov 08, 2017 10:47 am

Pablo wrote: Wow! :goodpost

"But one also has to remember in that story Hekate is also more a High Priest to Artemis than an Actual goddess in her own right.". Does this imply that Hekate was a physical person? I am thinking a (subsequently) deified ancestor here.


I don't think it was so much a deified ancestor as an attempt to "Fix" her place in historical context. Figure Hekate has roughly four heritages as to who her parentage are trying to place her in the Olympian pantheon. Those being a daughter of Nyx, a daughter of Perses and Asteria (sister to Leto) which ties her to Artemis as an Great Aunt, a daughter of Demeter, a daughter of Zeus and Asteria. Though Perses and Asteria are the most common and referenced.

None of which really work with this particular story and the overall Trojan war scenario. Figure the basic premise of this story is the Greek fleet can't sail to the war because Artemis has been offended. To appease that offense Iphigenia has to be sacrificed to Artemis where upon she is taken and transferred to Taruis to become "Hekate" the High Priestess to Artemis. There she will be forced to make human sacrifice of all ship wrecked people to the sacred idol of Artemis. One of those men will be her brother Orestes who will aid her in stealing the idol and taking it from the blood sacrifice and the basic defilement.

I can't prove it but wonder if it is not an attempt to discredit the influence from Karia and other parts of the uncivilized world at the time. Yet Lagina really has not become a place of influence yet and Hekate has not gained a name outside of that area from what I can determine.

It also tends to keep that inside Hellas equals civilized outside Hellas uncivilized concept going.
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monsnoleedra
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Re: Odd Insights into Hekate

Post#57 » Wed Nov 08, 2017 12:07 pm

talerman wrote:monsnoleedra :goodpost

What I am going to write below are not my thoughts at all, but I tried to summarise some more modern interpretations of Hecate. So I wonder what you think what can be right and what can be wrong from the below few sentences . Yes, off course, I would also like to hear Pablo's and other respected members opinions:

In modern interpretation Selena passes the Moon to Hecate when it is waning. She is seen as a third aspect of the Moon Goddess together with Diana and Selena. Yet, she also has three different aspects as: the goddess of fertility and abundance; the goddess of the Moon, magic and night; and the goddess of spirits and shadows. Some witches use Hecate's wheel as Hecate's symbol. This wheel represents Hecate in her three aspects. It has a form of a labyrinth as Hecate is also a protector of the crossroads. In that function, she looks at three directions. The modern witches say that Hecate is a high priestess who found her inner knowledge and is ready to teach others. They also say that Hecate represents the dark within us and a part of our psych which we don't accept. Her powers are appalling and she definitely doesn't belong to tender goddesses - her rage is swift and violent against the ones who dare to bring evil to her devotees. Modern worshipers evoke Hecate usually at the Waning Moon in order to banish evil spirits, remove bad habits or talk to the dead. She is also evoked by some magicians to bring justice.  She is usually associated to: star sapphire, moon stone, pearls, larch, cypress, poppy, oak, camphor, bows, aloes dogs, horses and black cats. Her favorite colors are silver and black.


Let me address this out of sequence.

First off I despise the so called Hekate's wheel. They claim it to be based off of a passage from the Chaldean oracles but the passage cited has nothing to do with the image they've drawn. Historically there is absolutely nothing at any site that in any way resembles it. Ask any of them it's origin and no one has ever given a legitimate answer to the question.

And now as Paul Harvey used to say for the rest of the story:

The cited oracle fragment:

Verse 194 "Labour about the Hecatick Strophalus"


Nothing there about any wheel. If you look up a strophalus the closest thing you find is actually what they think is a cube like device with holes in it. Probably about 6 inches to a foot in size and perhaps similar to a incense holder used in a Christian church today. Where it might differ is it could also be something similar to the device that was believe used during a deipnon where hot coals and the waste from ones meal was added and it was spun about the head and the hot coals would burn up the waste material to basically incinerate it.

The other option is that of the Inyx which was also a type of strophalos. That was basically a singing bird or spinning wheel and magical device. Could be a few inches in size or large enough to be actually hung from a ceiling and made to catch the wind and would sing like a bird. Today it's a common kids trick where you draw a bird on one side of a disk and a cage on the other run a string through the center and pull the string to make the disk spin. The bird appears to be in the cage when you view it. Of course that is a very basic one as a magical one would have holes to make it sing and other "Things" on it. But it was associated with other goddesses and is actually seen as walking wheels and other spinning wheels on quite a few pottery images and such.

Today's so called Wheel is basically owed to Jade Sol Luna and his book Hecate near as I can determine. He's the only author who actually drew it out and defined what it was for and how to use it. Though to me it sure look like someone took an old 45 record center and traced it out and used the P. T. Barnum method of selling things.

Associations get to be interesting to be honest. Cats comes from the middle ages as far as I am concerned. It's the typical old hag story. But mythology wise she is not associated with cats nor do they figure in her mythology, the only cats in her mythology are weasels. They are referred to cats or polecats, but they are not sacred to her. Dogs, well Hekate was only associated with female black dogs and then mostly puppies that were to be sacrificed to her. But people tend not to like that. She does have dogs that are associated to her in her capacity as a driver of the restless dead and the baying of hounds to mark her passage but it never really says what age the dogs are. About the only things is they tend to be black, then mostly due to black is associated with all things chthonic and the underworld. Horses are not sacred to her either, that comes from a visual of her from her Chaldean persona. She is called Horse faced. But she is also called Cow Faced as well if I recall correctly. Funny that people don't tend to call upon her Lion or Serpent face though.

I've never seen a reference to her and Oak to be honest. Figure Zeus is connected to Oak and it is his wood. It's a lightning wood and attracts it quite often so don't really see where she'd be attracted to that personally. Cypress is Artemis' wood and has been part of many of her sacred groves. So that seem's to be more of the conflating of that lore. In most lore I am familiar with Hekate's sacred wood is Hemlock which also has a connection to both the underworld and is deadly.

Have no idea why Hekate would be associated with the Bow. Again that is conflating of Artemis and Hekate. Well I suppose some could say it is conflating of Diana and Hekate as that seems to be another common union. Be the same with the usage of the Spear as an association though Diana was associated with the Spear more than Artemis. Yet Artemis does have a Spear association in Northern Hellas, especially when she gets associated with Bendis. However, the spear association is a bit more difficult to separate out when the imagery is using the single long shafted torch in the advancing stance. In that display the primary means of defining the spear from the torch is usually a small distortion at the head of the shaft that is supposed to suggest a flame. When the advancing stance uses the double torches then it is easier to identify. However, Demeter is also portrayed using the single long staffed torch in an advancing stance so imagery alone is not always enough to identify. So Hekate, Demeter, Artemis & Diana all use the spear and / or torch imagery but the bow is not used with Hekate. About the only exception I can think of to that rule is at Lake Nemi with depictions of Diana Nemorensis. Those depictions show three figurines standing side by side of which one does have a bow but it is not the figure believed to be Hekate / triformus. That only occurs on coins not statuary.

In truth I disagree with how most modern pagans see and "Work with" Hekate. I do not like the trinity notion of the moon phases of Diana (New moon) - Luna (all Moon) - Hekate (Dark moon) due to the fact while the Romans and earlier Hellens did see the goddesses as overlapping it wasn't that simple. Today most pagans really do not understand the totality of how the pantheons worked. They do not have Juno in there in her capacity as the moon for instance yet she held that role in the Latin pantheon. There are other moon goddesses as well that hold powers and influences there. There are no clear cut lines and boundaries like modern pagans try to draw and make. Luna never looses her position as the Moon.

That is the other thing use one or the other. It's either Diana-Luna-Hekate or Artemis-Selene-Hekate to be honest it makes the person look both lazy and to a degree stupid if they can't get the stuff straight. It's bad enough they can't get the mythology straight and keep the stories straight as to who did what.

Yet part of that is due to the "Updating" of things to make them work for today. Consider Artemis is a virgin goddess. Ok but virgin in ancient Hellas and Roman times didn't mean unknown to man, it meant unbound or unbeholden to man. So she could be a mother or sexually active. Yet today virgin implies something different. Diana as a Virgin goddess is different than Artemis as a virgin goddess but that is lost in the conflating of the lore.

The three faces of Hekate look upon the three realms she watches over and hold dominion over. Does that equate to the crossroads? Well that depends at Lagina there is debate that she equated to the crossroads. Yet in Thrace Enodia with whom she is conflated did equate to the crossroads. Yet my UPG is the three heads also equate to the three keys that mean she holds the keys to what might be, what could be and what will be. But that is also the three worlds of celestial, earthly and water. But the crossroads is also my past, my present and my future and the hecataea is both the guide and warning.

I disagree she is the dark within us for she is the shinning one. I also disagree with the waning aspect for she has always stood upon the liminal spots and times to ward against the shadows and ward away things. She stood at the entrance of ones homes and temples at all times, not just at the waning moon to drive away evil and prevent it's entry. Like the gorgon upon the pediment of the temple her face and eyes look outward upon all who approach and welcome those who have permission to enter yet frighten away those who would try to enter with ill intent.

The dead are restless all hours of the day and night and again do not wait until the waxing and waning of the moon to act up. As one who calls the restless dead she does not wait till the moon wains to do that either for her hounds maybe heard on nay night whether the moon be dark and hidden or full and bright baying as the dead are pushed and called. Waiting for the waning moon to my perspective is more Christian lore of dark and evil things lurking in the night and shadow.

Bright Coiffed Hekate walks in the full moon just as easily as Artemis strikes under the dark moon in vengeance.
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Re: Odd Insights into Hekate

Post#58 » Wed Nov 08, 2017 4:43 pm

provenant wrote:
Leonardo_Drakon wrote:
phillip wrote:Ha - I too was working with Hekate last night due to the Dark Moon. The twin torches representing the two morning/evening planets - the concept is fascinating! Thank you for the links, as well - I will enjoy settling down with a cup of coffee and going through the material as soon as I take off my shoes. I am unsure if it against the T&C here to post the Facebook link you mentioned, but would you point me in that direction if possible?


I'm not quite sure what the rules are here regarding Facebook, so I sent you a PM with the info.


Just saw this point about posting FB links ... completely fine. I think most folks here have FB. SA has a FB group as well. Now I'm curious as to what the link was ... So post it Leonardo. ;)


Hey Provenant, unfortunately I don’t have the exact link to the post, I went through my pms and I just sent Phillip to the Hekate’s Crossroad group on Facebook. At the time it was a topic of heated debate over there and would have been at the top of the group discussions, but that was over two years ago.


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talerman
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Re: Odd Insights into Hekate

Post#59 » Thu Nov 09, 2017 7:20 am

monsnoleedra, thanks for your explanation. I was thinking about this the way you explained, but unlike you, I have not explored Hecate as deeply and thoroughly as you did, so yes, I'd say your comment is precious and should be remembered.
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Re: Odd Insights into Hekate

Post#60 » Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:03 pm

monsnoleedra wrote:In most lore I am familiar with Hekate's sacred wood is Hemlock which also has a connection to both the underworld and is deadly.


Do you mean the Hemlock tree (Tsuga ssp.), native to Japan and North America, or the Hemlock herb (Conium maculatum), native to Europe and North Africa? It is the latter that is known as the Bane of Socrates. But because of the name, there have been much confusion...

:thinking

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